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Black History Month: Home

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Native American Inspired Books

Belva Davis covered many of the most explosive stories of the last half-century, including the Black Panthers, the Jonestown massacre, the Moscone/Milk murders, the onset of the AIDS epidemic, and Osama bin Laden's activities in Africa. Along the way, she encountered a cavalcade of cultural icons: Malcolm X, Frank Sinatra, James Brown, Nancy Reagan, Huey Newton, Muhammad Ali, Alex Haley, Fidel Castro, and others. Her absorbing memoir traces the trajectory of an extraordinary life in extraordinary times.

"Strange Fruit, Volume I, Uncelebrated narratives from Black history is a collection of stories from African American history that exemplifies success in the face of great adversity. This unique graphic anthology offers historical and cultural commentary on nine uncelebrated heroes whose stories are not often found in history books. 

The companion volume to the 50th-anniversary edition of Black Like Me, this book features John Howard Griffin's later writings on racism and spirituality. Conveying a progressive evolution in thinking, it further explores Griffin's ethical stand in the human rights struggle and nonviolent pursuit of equality? 

What meaning does the American public attach to images of key black political, social, and cultural figures? Considering photography's role as a means of documenting historical progress, what is the representational currency of these images? How do racial icons "signify"? Nicole R. Fleetwood's answers to these questions will change the way you think about the next photograph that you see depicting a racial event, black celebrity, or public figure. 

'Challenging Misrepresentations of Black Womanhood' investigates the stereotyping of Black womanhood and the larger sociological impact on Black women's self-perceptions. It details the historical and contemporary use of stereotypes against Black women and how Black women work to challenge and dispel false perceptions, and highlights the role of racist ideas in the reproduction and promotion of stereotypes of Black femaleness in media, literature, artificial intelligence and the perceptions of the general public. 

When high jumper Alice Coachman won the high jump title at the 1941 national championships with "a spectacular leap," African American women had been participating in competitive sport for close to twenty-five years. Yet it would be another twenty years before they would experience something akin to the national fame and recognition that African American men had known since the 1930's, the days of Joe Louis and Jesse Owens. 

Barack Obama, in his acclaimed campaign speech discussing the troubling complexities of race in America today, "ed William Faulkner's famous remark "The past isn't dead and buried. In fact, it isn't even past." In Not Even Past, award-winning historian Thomas Sugrue examines the paradox of race in Obama's America and how President Obama intends to deal with it. 

Long before Civil Rights, the Tuskegee Airmen fought for equality. First they integrated the Armed Forces, then a whole nation and did it with competency, skill, valor, and courage in combating the enemy abroad and racism at home. Because they stood tall, African Americans and fellow Americans are the better for it. 

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